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Performance Management and a Growth Mindset

This post has been co-authored by Carlos Davidovich and Fran Sardone

Carlos Davidovich, Optimum Talent’s Neuromanagement Coach, and I have been discussing the upcoming event Reinventing Performance Management on June 21. We’ve been reading some of Deloitte’s publications and swapping performance review stories – misery loves company!

For Carlos, whose first career was as a medical doctor, this topic gives him a chuckle:

I studied medicine at a public university in Argentina, surrounded by scores of students in each class and almost no contact with the professors. The only chance to succeed and progress was passing the yearly exam. We were very curious about how other educational models were dealing with this situation (Harvard, etc.). As students we heard that Ivy League medical schools started with 100 students and finished with 100 students! Then we were told that in those schools, in those models, there were no exams. The professor/student contact was so high that a final yearly exam was not needed. When the learner was having difficulties, the issues were addressed immediately, so that learning could advance and the stu-dent could progress.

This ‘leave no learner behind’ philosophy reminded me of my past job at a university teaching and learning department.

Fran: Deloitte seems to be making the distinction between summative and formative feedback, concepts well known in education.

• Summative feedback is quantitative:
Your assignment is graded as B- or 73%. It’s a judgement about a past event fixed in time (like an exam), consequently the stakes are high.

• Formative feedback is qualitative:
Your assignment strengths and weaknesses are reviewed and discussed. It’s an appreciation of the ongoing situation by both parties. Since feedback gives the opportunity to improve perfor-mance, the stakes are low.

Josh Bersin of Deloitte does a great job of explaining the myth of the bell curve approach to performance management. Like the 100% final medical exam, force ranking doesn’t do anything to help people grow and perform better.

So here’s the question I have for Carlos:

Fran: In a higher education setting, I’m willing to receive feedback from a professor because she’s an expert in the subject I’m studying. Why am I willing to accept feed-back from a manager who might be senior to me in hierarchy, but not necessarily in professional or technical expertise?

Carlos: One of the key components of a performance feedback process is trust, in both directions. The manager needs to trust that the employee is right for the role. The employee needs to trust that the manager is competent and supportive. They have to believe in one another and cultivate a growth mind-set. Together they can work on the potential inherent in the employee to get the job done on behalf of the organization. The way to provoke this is by leaving the ball in the employee’s court – the work belongs to him. But the only way the employee succeeds organizationally is through regular, continuous, supportive dialogue so that he stays on course.

Can organizations actually change gears sufficiently to cultivate this type of environment? Time will tell.

Career vs job sphere in cubes to illustrate a great work opportu

Career Management + Career Accountability =Life Time Employment

Some of us are told education is the key for success; others are told to work for a large company, the government or a bank, and the expected result is a job for life. The truth is that in a very volatile marketplace in the 21st century, there is no one ingredient for success. You need to apply a number of strategies and approaches to ensure your marketability. You are the only person that can secure life-time employment.

People today need to deal with greater uncertainty in the marketplace and a good way to do this is to take ownership of your career. It is clear that individuals who consciously invest in their careers stand out from other employees.

Group of young business people sitting around table on office te

To take your career in your own hands, start with implementing these simple strategies:

1. Assessment & Mindset: Through self-assessments and self awareness, know your strengths and areas that need improvement, and determine if those are what are in demand in the marketplace. Make sure your skill-set is up to date. Know what you need for today, and for tomorrow.  Understand the challenges and influences within and around you.

2. Reputation Awareness: Everyone has a reputation, and it is important to manage yours effectively. Understand your own credibility and track record, and how you are perceived by others. Speak to a manager, colleagues and even friends for feedback on their experiences with   you. Do some self-reflection through someone else’s eyes and then determine what qualities and characteristics to keep working on and what should remain the same.

3. Network: Cross network and really get to know the people on your team, within your company and in the marketplace. Taking the time to network is a crucial investment in your career. “Coffee” and “lunch” are important skills to learn and have. Networking while you are in a position is equally as important as when you’re looking for a job.

4. Sharing Goals: Managers can’t read minds, so give them a sense of who you are, what you want and your expectations. Seek out your manager, don’t just wait for your quarterly or annual review. Have ongoing career conversations in formal and informal settings.

5. Understand your Why:  Why do you do what you do?  We know the difference between a person that is truly passionate and aligned with what they are doing and the person that just shows up to work.  If you can, always articulate “why” your value to the organization will be clear.

 

I Love My Job

What Eulogies and Careers Have in Common

According to Common last Words of Dying People in the Huffington Post over 56% of dying people talked about their careers and how important they were in their lives.  Yet Careers are easily dismissed as not important especially as people step into retirement or during the later stages of our life.  How many times have we heard “your career won’t be mentioned on your grave stone or Eulogy, nor will the number of hours you spent at the office”.  Why not?   I want my career to be mentioned on my gravestone and in my Eulogy…

‘Here lies Sandra Boyd Career Consultant’

I am proud of the work I have done and how I have supported so many people in their career.  I am proud of the fact that I have only done work I am passionate about and guided my children to find work they enjoy.

We spend such a large portion of our waking hours working and we should at the very least like what we do and the people we work with.  I have spent my career coaching and supporting other people in their careers and I am saddened when people tell me they are “waiting for a package” which in some cases they wait years in silent misery.  When people tell me they hate their job, the people they worked with and the company they work for yet they will not even consider writing a resume to at least explore finding an opportunity more fulfilling. 

We get one life but we can have multiple career or job opportunities so why not actively manage your career.  I don’t believe that every person is meant to jump out of bed each morning excited to go to work but if you feel like you are going to throw up every Sunday night dreading Monday morning it may be time to at least consider looking at the job market.

Passion is not only for work some enjoy their jobs but save their passion for other aspects of life.  My husband is passionate about golf, music and his family, work is not his top priority but he has a job where he respects his colleagues and likes the work he does.  He has been able to find that balance.  I on the other hand, have no hobbies, I can’t play golf and a good time for me is reading a book that directly relates to my work. You don’t have to want your work to be the focus of your Eulogy but you want to ensure you are not stuck in a job you hate with no way out.

Always ensure you are familiar with your options:

  • Have an up to date resume
  • Network with someone outside your company at least once a week
  • Ask for feedback to understand from your peers how they value their work environment
  • Research the job market on a regular basis
  • Understand the market trends inside and outside your industry
  • Know your skills, attributes, strengths and gaps and recent accomplishments so you know how relevant they are to what employers are looking for
  • If you don’t want to leave your current company explore internal opportunities
  • Never have a mind set of “waiting for the package” people will know or feel that you have given up and don’t care – find the positive side of your work
  • Spend at least a few hours a month reviewing your career and ask yourself if you are satisfied or if you need to make changes
  • Seek a professional career coach if you are confused and need to think through your next step – invest in your career

Be willing to step outside your comfort zone so you can at least feel comfortable in the job you are in.

Linkedin logo sign printed on paper

Simple Steps That Will Help Build your Connections on LinkedIn

For the past eight years, I’ve been helping people that are going through career transition with their LinkedIn strategy, and I always assign the same homework after their Profile has been updated: start connecting with people!  Your network is your key to everything in businessincluding finding your new role.

Linking entities. Network, networking, social media, internet co

What clients taught me early on was to assign this homework in the form of a dare. To many, connecting with others on social media seems like a daunting assignment. So daring, or even double-dog daring people to engage in this business handshake provides the motivation they need. However, even if the motivation is enough to get you started, what do you do next?  Who are you going to connect with, especially when you’re feeling a little tentative about the ‘whole social media thing’?  Which people do you want to reach out to, especially if you’re still feeling raw from exiting your last job? 

Here is what I would like to suggest to those of you who no longer have access to your workplace Outlook contacts. I’m going to dare you to data mine your existing contacts on LinkedIn. There’s no need to try recalling names from memory and this is a great way to ease into networking meetings with people you know and like. Keep in mind, this advice is based on the latest LinkedIn interface.  Don’t blink or it might change again!

  • From the LinkedIn navigation bar, pick My Network – Connections.
  • Click on the name of a person you worked with (this doesn’t have to be recent). After their Profile pops up, look for their number of connections.  This is a link. Go ahead and click on the number. Now you should see some people with label next to their name that reads ‘2nd’. These are your 2nd level connections.  In a nutshell, this means that you are not connected to them directly but instead, through another connection you currently have. Now is the time to connect – that social media business handshake that I mentioned earlier. You will likely recognize some of these people labeled 2nd.  People you’ve worked with, done business with, etc.
  • Click on their Connect link and you’ll see a template: Invite “name goes here” to connect on LinkedIn.
  • Complete the entry for how you know each other. This can be as simple as “Hi Fran:  I was taking a few minutes to update my LinkedIn contacts and spotted your name.  Would you like to connect?” Naturally, if you know this person well, you’ll craft a suitably personal note.

Oh, I forgot to mention the best part. You’ll do this daily for a week while treating yourself to your favourite cuppa tea, café corretto, glass of wine or beer – time of day permitting! 

Give this a try.  How many connections did you start with?  How many connections do you have after a week – or whatever term of time you picked?

I dare you…no, I double-dog dare you to share your results!